Beautiful Mosques

Beautiful and historical mosques around the world



                        

Browsing Posts tagged Medina

Masjid al-Qiblatain


Masjid al-Qiblatain is a mosque in Medina that is historically important for Muslims as the place where a companion leading the prayer was told of the change of Qibla and did 180 turn he is said to have been commanded to change the direction of prayer from Jerusalem to Mecca. Thus it uniquely contained two prayer niches (mihrabs). Recently the mosque was renovated, removing the old prayer niche facing Jerusalem and leaving the one facing Mecca.

Muhammad was leading the prayer when he received a revelation from Allah instructing him to take the Kaaba as the Qiblah as in the Qur’anic verse 2:144. According to the accounts, Muhammad, who had been facing Jerusalem during the prayer, upon receiving this revelation, immediately turned around to face Mecca, and those praying behind him also did so. After this, the mosque in which this incident occurred came to be known as Masjid al-Qiblatain (i.e. ‘Mosque of the Two Qiblahs’).

Masjid Meeqat

Miqat mosque is located at Dhul Hulayfa, also known as Abyar Ali. It is the place where pilgrims coming from Medina wishing to perform Umrah or Hajj enter into Ehram before they set for Mecca.

The distance from the Prophet`s Mosque to Miqat Mosque is 9 Kilometers.
The Architect of Miqat Mosque Complex is Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil.

Masjid Al Quba

The Quba Mosque is just outside Medina, and is the first mosque of the world. Its first stones were positioned by the prophet Muhammad on his Hijrah from Mecca to Medina and the mosque was completed by his companions. Muhammad (s.a.w.) spent more than 20 nights in this mosque (after migrating).

When Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil was commissioned, in the 20th century, to conceive a larger mosque to replace the old mosque, he intended to incorporate old structure into his design. But the old mosque was torn down and replaced with a new one.
The new mosque consists of a rectangular prayer hall raised on a second storey platform.
Six additional entrances are dispersed on the northern, eastern and western façades. Four minarets mark the corners of the prayer hall. The minarets rest on square bases, have octagonal shafts which take on a circular shape as they reach the top.

The prayer hall is arranged around a central courtyard, characterized by six large domes resting on clustered columns. A portico, which is two bays in depth, borders the courtyard on the east and west, while a one-bayed portico borders it on the north, and separates it from the women’s prayer area.

The women’s prayer area, which is surrounded by a screen, is divided into two parts as a passageway connects the northern entrance with the courtyard.

When Quba Mosque was rebuilt in 1986, the Medina architecture was retained – ribbed white domes, and basalt facing and modest exterior – qualities that recalls Madina’s simplicity. The courtyard, is flagged with black, red and white marble. It is screened overhead by day from the scorching heat with shades. Arabesque latticework filters the light of the palm groves outside.