Shaybanid ruler Abdullah Khan II (1556-1598) built this madresa as a residential theological school, immediately opposite his earlier Madar-i Khan Madresa (1566-67), thus creating another of Bukhara’s typical double madrasa ensembles (kush madrasa).

Built during Bukhara’s third and last great construction phase when numerous civic structures were commissioned such as caravan serais, tims, taks, hauz and khanqahs. This madresa is noted for its mastery of architectural form, plan and structure at a period of declining trade, political stability and lack of architectural innovation.

Russian archaeological teams extensively restored the madrasa’s exterior tile work in the 1950s. The volute arch and dado of the pishtaq display intricate floral patterns in majolica and are fine examples of contemporary workmanship.